STUDY SHEET FOR HISTORY 111, EXAM 4

A. Exam 4 will be given Friday, June 30, 2000.

B. Exam 4 will cover:

  1. All lectures from June 22 (Beginning of the Early Modern Period) through June 29.
  2. Perry et al., Western Civilization, pages 323-409.
    Use the text to answer questions which occur to you as you study other materials, to cover topics we have not had time to discuss in class, and to reinforce in your memory the material we cover in class.
  3. As you review the textbook, don't forget to give special attention to the material on the consolidation of national states and the rise of absolutism in the early modern period (pgs. 378-409) which was covered on Quiz 4.
  4. Give priority to studying lecture notes.

C. Outline Of Exam 4

  1. Take-home question (20 points).
    1. Refer to the handout entitled "Take-home Questions for Exams" for questions. Don't forget to choose a different question topic than you used on previous exams.
    2. Write your essay about the period of history beginning with the Modern Period (A.D. 1500) and ending with the Age of Absolutism.
  2. In-class essay question (30 points, 20 minutes)
  3. Multiple choice and short answer questions (50 points, 25 minutes)
  4. The size and structure of the final exam will be the same as the previous tests, but you may use the full hour and one-half of the final class period to complete the exam.

D. In-Class Essays for Exam 4

Students will be required to answer ONE in-class essay question as a part of Exam 4. The following is a list of potential essay questions for the exam. Two of the essays questions below will be on Exam 4. Each student will pick one of these questions to answer on of the exam. Be sure to cite specific examples to support your answers.

  1. Discuss the condition of the Catholic Church on the eve of the Protestant Reformation. What corruptions and abuses existed within the Church? What were some of the groups which hoped to reform the church in the fifteenth century? What were their major goals for reform?

  2. Discuss the life of Martin Luther. What was his family background? How and why did he become dissatisfied with Catholicism? What events led to his break with Catholicism? How did Luther's new theology differ from that of the medieval Catholic Church?

  3. Discuss the spread of Lutheranism. What factors account for the rapid spread of Lutheranism across Germany?

  4. Discuss the four Protestant traditions of the sixteenth century. How were they alike? How were they different? Which modern Protestant denominations are derived from each tradition? How did each tradition begin?

  5. Discuss the Catholic Reformation and Counter-Reformation. What were the major elements of reform in these two movements? What successes did these movements have? What failures did they have?

  6. Discuss Europe's religious wars from 1521-1648. (Discuss specifically the Hapsburg-Valois Wars, the French Wars of Religion, the Wars of Philip II of Spain, the Thirty Years' War, and the English Civil War.) What role did religious factors play in promoting each of these wars? How was Europe's religious situation affected by each of these wars?

  7. Discuss the origins of the European explorations of the fifteenth century. What factors promoted European exploration during the fifteenth century? Why were European explorers originally interested in sailing South rather than West into the Atlantic? What were the principal goals of European explorations before 1492? Why did Columbus sail West?

  8. Discuss the Spanish colonization of the Western Hemisphere. What were the major areas conquered by Spain? Why did Spain have such an easy time conquering large portions of the Western Hemisphere? What were the effects of Spanish Conquest on Indians, Africans, Europeans, and the development of history?


| This page was last updated on 1/18/01. | Return to History 111 Supplements | Site Map |
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| Quiz Assignments | Quiz 1 | Quiz 2 | Quiz 3 | Quiz 4 |

Dr. Harold D. Tallant, Department of History, Georgetown College
400 East College Street, Georgetown, KY 40324, (502) 863-8075
E-mail: htallant@georgetowncollege.edu.