STUDY SHEET FOR HISTORY 223, EXAM 2

A. Exam 2 will be held on Wednesday, November 10, 1999.

B. Exam 2 will cover:

  1. All lectures from October 8 (the Articles of Confederation) through November 8 (Romanticism, Revivalism, and Reform).
  2. Tindall and Shi, America: A Narrative History, chaps. 7-10, 12-13.
    Use the text to answer questions which occur to you as you study other materials, to cover topics we have not had time to discuss in class, and to reinforce in your memory the material we cover in class.
  3. Madaras and SoRelle, Taking Sides, pgs. 113-159.
  4. Give priority to studying lecture notes.

C. Outline Of Exam 2

  1. Take-home essay question (20 points)
    1. Refer to the handout entitled "Take-home Questions for Exams" for questions.
    2. Write your essay about the period of history beginning with the enactment of the Articles of Confederation and ending with the Election of 1828 and the cultural movements of romanticism, revivalism, and reform.
  2. In-class essay question (30 points, 20 minutes)
  3. Multiple choice and short answer questions (50 points, 25 minutes)
D. In-Class Essays for Exam 2

Students will be required to answer ONE in-class essay question as a part of Exam 2. The following is a list of potential essay questions for the exam. Two of the essays questions below will be on Exam 2. Each student will pick one of these questions to answer on of the exam.


  1. Discuss the major weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and the efforts made to overcome these weaknesses before 1787.

  2. Defend or refute the following statement: The U.S. Constitution was primarily an economic document which was written to protect the specific economic interests of the Founding Fathers (the authors of the Constitution).

  3. Discuss Hamilton's Financial Program. Explain each of Hamilton's three major proposals for economic reform. Which specific economic problems was he trying to address with these proposals? Which of Hamilton's proposals were enacted into law? What was the impact of Hamilton's program?

  4. Discuss the development of political parties in the Washington Administration. What factors caused the rise of the parties? How did the parties differ in regard to major issues? Which social and economic groups supported each party?

  5. Discuss American involvement in the Anglo-French wars of 1793-1800. What disputes did the U.S. have with these nations during this period? What measures did Washington and Adams take to resolve these issues without war? How successful were these measures? Why did the U.S. ultimately become involved in an undeclared naval war with France in 1798?

  6. Discuss American involvement in the Anglo-French wars of 1803-12. What disputes did the U.S. have with these nations during this period? What measures did Jefferson and Madison take to resolve these issues without war? How successful were these measures? Why did the U.S. ultimately go to war against Britain in 1812?

  7. Discuss the Market Revolution, 1815-60. What was the Market Revolution? What events caused the Market Revolution? What was American society like before the Market Revolution? What specific changes were prompted by the Market Revolution? How did these changes affect the overall pattern of American life by 1860?

  8. Discuss the issue of American nationalism during the Era of Good Feelings. What prompted the emergence of nationalism during this period? How did the policies of the federal government reflect the upsurge in nationalism? Did the growth of nationalism have a positive or negative impact on the development of the U.S. during the Era of Good Feelings?

  9. Some historians have argued that the "good feelings" of the period after the War of 1812 were superficial and that there remained many fundamental divisions among Americans. In your opinion, were the "good feelings" of the postwar period more important than the divisions among Americans? Why?


HIS 223: Introduction to American History, 1492-1877

HIS 223: Introduction to American History, 1877-Present

This page was last updated on 11/3/99
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Departmental Courses in American History and Civilization:
| AMS 250 | HIS 223 | HIS 225 | HIS 227 | HIS 306 |
| HIS 308 | HIS 310 | HIS 312 | HIS 314 | HIS 318 | HIS 325 |
| HIS 338 | HIS 426 | HIS 430 | HIS 432 | HIS 470 | HIS 475 |

Dr. Harold D. Tallant, Department of History, Georgetown College
400 East College Street, Georgetown, KY 40324, (502) 863-8075
E-mail: htallant@georgetowncollege.edu.

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