MUS 112

Determining Secondary Dominant Chords

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To determine Roman numeral analysis symbol:

 

Accidentals!!!
A major triad or major-minor 7th chord that is not diatonic to the key
First, determine root of chord (not necessarily bass note) Go down at P5 from root to determine tonicized scale degree/chord Chord is either a V/? or V7/? of that scale degree

... piece of cake

To confirm:
Next chord (tonicized chord) is normally built on that scale degree

 

Formula:  Sec. Dom. Chord minus P5 = V(7) / Scale Degree

Examples:

Key:  D major

  • B, D#, F# chord appears.  D# accidental (not diatonic to D maj.) indicates secondary dominant triad.  

  • Root of chord is B.

  • Go down P5 below B to determine tonicized scale degree/chord, which is E.  E is second scale degree.

  • Analysis:  B, D#, F# = V/ii.  (Following chord would normally be ii ... E minor chord.)

Key:  Eb major

  • B, G, F, D chord appears.  B-natural (not diatonic to Eb maj.) indicates secondary dominant chord.

  • Root of chord is G (G, B, D, F)--a V7 chord.  (Chord appears in first inversion.)

  • Go down a P5 below G to determine tonicized scale degree/chord, which is C.  C is the sixth scale degree.

  • Analysis:  B, G, F, D = V65/vi.  (Following chord would normally be vi ... C minor chord.)  [Re chord analysis symbol ... the "6" should be a superscript over the subscript "5."  Not an easy thing to do here on el webbo.]

Key:  D minor

  • B, E, G# chord appears.  B-natural and G# (not diatonic to D min.) indicate secondary dominant triad.  

  • Root of chord is E.  (Chord appears in second inversion.)

  • Go down a P5 below E to determine tonicized scale degree/chord, which is A.  A is fifth scale degree.

  • Analysis:  B, E, G# = V64/V.  (Following chord would normally be V ... A major.)  [Re chord analysis symbol ... the "6" should be a superscript over the subscript "4."]

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