MUS 312 Form & Analysis

A. Structural Phenomena

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  1. CADENCE:  As a structural phenomenon, cadence is understood as a point of relative cessation of musical activity.

  1. TONALITY:  An abrupt change in key or mode may be a structural phenomenon.

  1. TEMPO:  Changes in speed of the beat may be structural phenomena.

  1. METER:  An audible change in the organization of subdivisions within beats, or of beats within measures, may be a structural phenomenon.

  1. RHYTHM:  A systematic change in prevailing note value, without a change in tempo or meter, may be a structural phenomenon.

  1. DYNAMICS:  A change in volume can be an important indication of structural division.

  1. DENSITY:  A change in the amount of musical space filled may be associated with a break in the design.

  1. TIMBRE:  A change in tone color may easily be perceived as a structural phenomenon.

  1. REGISTER:  An abrupt change in the range in which musical events occur may be perceived as a structural phenomenon.

  1. TEXTURE:  A change in the rhythmic and melodic relationships between voices is often an easily perceived structural phenomenon.

  1. MOTIVE:  The return of a prominent melodic or rhythmic event may signal a division in the design, and so may be considered a structural phenomenon.

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