MUS 514A / CSC 514A

MIDI Computer Music
Syllabus, Module I, Summer 2006

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GEORGETOWN COLLEGE GRADUATE EDUCATION
MUS 514A / CSC 514A MIDI Computer Music (3 hours credit) (Monday/Wednesday/Friday)
Syllabus, Summer Module I, May 22 - June 16, 2006
NMB 11, 5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
(with class consensus?--probably switching to 9:00 a.m. - 12:30 noon
when public school classes have ended)
Dr. Sonny Burnette, Office: NMB 12
Office: 502-863-8112; Home: 502-863-4152
Web site:  http://spider.georgetowncollege.edu/music/burnette/index.html
E-mail:  Sonny_Burnette@georgetowncollege.edu

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Study of the essential components of MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) technology: synthesizer and sequencer capabilities; sequence recording and editing; computer music terminology; music notation software. Prerequisites: ability to read music; basic instrumental keyboard competency.

TEXTBOOKS
Williams, David Brian; Webster, Peter Richard.  Experiencing Music Technology, 2nd edition.  Belmont, California:  Wadsworth Group/Thomson Learning, 1999.  [ISBN 0-02-865324-6]  (The text is not required.  My copy will be placed on Reserve in the Lab.)

Pellman, Samuel. An Introduction to the Creation of Electroacoustic Music.  Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1994.  [ISBN 0-534-21450-9]  (The text is not required.  My copy will be placed on Reserve in the Lab.)

REQUIRED MATERIALS
(1) 3.5" floppy disk, (2) cassette tape/CD-R, (3) music score/sheet music of your choosing; also, I'll make available some "fake books" if you desire, (4) score paper–optional.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of the course, you should be able to: (1) define common computer-music/digital terminology, (2) describe and demonstrate the functions of a digital synthesizer and sequencer, (3) record multi-track works, (4) edit digitally-recorded multi-track works, (5) save recorded data to disk or other media, (6) demonstrate the ability to correctly interface MIDI hardware with connecting cables to create a functioning MIDI lab station, (7) demonstrate basic knowledge of computer music sequencing using Cakewalk software, and computer notation using Finale software, (8) implement relevant aspects of these technologies into your own teaching.

This course emphasizes the following goals of the Georgetown College Education Program:  Critical Competencies and Understandings. B. Professional Competencies:  Instruction: 6. Demonstrate new concepts, 8. Use varied approaches to teaching, 9. Engage students in the learning process, 10. Provide students with practical applications, 11. Be flexible, adaptive, creative, 12. Use technology appropriately, 14. Encourage critical and creative thought, 15. Create an environment that supports and enhances learning. D. Professional Competencies:  Assessment: 6. Involve students in self-assessment. Ethical Values. A. Value/affirm human dignity: 2. Belief that all students can learn. Reflective Practice. 1. Function as an independent autonomous decision-maker, 2. Recognize the importance of continuous reflection, 3. Knowledge of opportunities for continuous professional development.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE COURSE: outlined on Contract for Grade form.

READINGS FROM TEXTS

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CREATION OF ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC
Samuel Pellman
EXPERIENCING MUSIC TECHNOLOGY
David Brian Williams &
Peter Richard Webster

Chapter 1, From Sound to Electricity and Back (pp. 1-13, 24-29)
Chapter 3, Digital Recording (pp. 61-80)
Chapter 5, The Musical Instrument Digital Interface (pp. 127-179)
Chapter 7, Tone Colors (pp. 209-223)
Chapter 9, Digital Sound Sampling and Synthesis (pp. 267-273; 312)

Introduction, pp. xxvi-xxx
Module 19, Software for Music Sequencing (pp. 349-383)
Module 20, MIDI Data Structures Revisited (pp. 384-406)
Module 16, Music Notation Software (pp. 275-309)
 

COURSE OUTLINE

Class One
Mon., May 22
Overview of MIDI technology
Components of a MIDI system
Familiarization with Roland patches (User, A, B, C, GM)
Roland synth function keys
Class Two
Wed., May 24
Cakewalk tutorial
Sequencing assignment:  Haydn symphony excerpt
Class Three
Fri., May 26
(reschedule)
Sequencing assignment: Haydn continued, editing
Cakewalk: Event List View, Piano Roll View, Staff View
Sequencing assignments:  Hodgepodge sheet, Step Recording, Quantization.
Test Review
Class Four
Mon., May 29
(Memorial Day)
(reschedule?)
TEST ONE
Begin work on Cakewalk Sequencing Project Number One (approx. three minutes of music ... must be approved by prof.).  This will be a multi-track art music work, such as an orchestra score, concert band score, SATB choir and piano score, or chamber music score requiring at least four tracks (string quartet, for example).
Class Five
Wed., May 31
Lab Time
Class Presentations of Sequencing Project Number One
Class Six
Fri., June 2
Begin work on Cakewalk Sequencing Project Number Two (approx. three minutes of music ... must be approved by prof.).  This project will be a multi-track music work in a commercial style, using piano (or whatever), bass and drums, perhaps strings, etc., etc.
Class Seven
Mon., June 5
Lab Time
Class Presentations of Sequencing Project Number Two
Test Review
Class Eight
Wed., June 7
TEST TWO
Introduction to Finale Music Notation Software
Class Nine
Fri., June 9
Finale notation examples:  Bach Gavotte, Lead Sheet, Hymn (incorporating "layers"), Music Theory example with figured bass symbols
Class Ten
Mon., June 12
Begin work on Finale Notation Project Number One
This project will be to duplicate the first page of a multi-stave score of any type, correct in every detail.  You also must extract parts.
Class Eleven
Wed., June 14
Begin work on Finale Notation Project Number Two
This project will be to duplicate the first page of a solo instrument part or voice part (such as a lead sheet), correct in every detail.
Research Paper due, if contracted
Test Review
Class Twelve
Fri., June 16
TEST THREE
Conclude work and submit Finale Notation Projects One & Two

 

Sequencing Projects:  Due to the diverse level of musical skills normally represented in the class, you are encouraged to choose music materials that are appropriately challenging for your abilities.  Preferably, you may wish to work on a project from your own music literature library which may have practical application.  For sequencing project number two, some graduate students have recorded performance tracks for their school choirs, or for personal use.  I have some popular music materials you may wish to borrow for your source.  Your recordings should be well edited, i.e., relatively free of mistakes.

Notation Projects:  The primary objective is to gain a fundamental understanding of the procedures involved in basic notation.  It will be impractical to study the program in depth.  The notation projects will involve reproducing the first page of (1) a multi-stave score of any type, and, (2) a solo instrument part or voice part (such as a lead sheet).  Both pages should be correct in every detail:  page layout, font type and size, dynamic and articulation markings, etc.  As part of the score notation project, we will discuss part extraction (creating individual files from score staves) and page layout.

EVALUATION
Each graduate student will contract for a grade.  See attached form.  Also, see under attendance.

ATTENDANCE
Attendance at all class meetings is strongly encouraged, however, you will be allowed one excused absence.  If you have a professional commitment, we can deal; please be sure to notify me in advance, however.  An unexcused absence will result in the lowering of your contracted grade by one letter for each additional absence beyond the one excused absence.  Should an emergency situation arise, individual arrangements should be made with the professor.

MISCELLANEOUS
A number of new MIDI-related texts have been ordered through the Learning Resource Center which should be helpful in writing a research paper, should you opt to write one.  The LRC also subscribes to:  Billboard, Computer Music Journal, Computers and Humanities, Down Beat, Electronic Musician, The Instrumentalist, Music Educators Journal, Music Teacher, Piano Quarterly.  Web searches may also be useful (try searches using "Electronic Music," "MIDI," "Computer Music," etc.). Be sure to provide bibliographic references, including web sites used.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Adams, Robert Train. Electronic Music Composition for Beginners. Dubuque, Iowa: Wm. C. Brown Communications, Inc., 1992.
Bates, John. The Synthesizer. Suffolk, England: Oxford University Press, 1988.
Boom, Michael. Music Through MIDI. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 1987.
DeFuria, Steve. The Secrets of Analog and Digital Synthesis. Pompton Lakes, New Jersey:  Third Earth Productions, 1988.
Dobson, Richard. A Dictionary of Electronic and Computer Music Technology: Instruments, Terms, Techniques. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.
Dodge, Charles. Computer Music: Synthesis, Composition, and Performance. New York: Schirmer Books, 1997.
Lloyd, Les. Technology and Teaching. Medford, New Jersey: Information Today, 1997.
Manning, Peter. Electronic and Computer Music. New York, New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.
Muro, Don. The Art of Sequencing: A Step by Step Approach. Merrick, New York: Electronic Music Productions, 1993.
Pellman, SamuelAn Introduction to the Creation of Electroacoustic Music.  Belmont, California:  Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1994.
Penfold, R.A. Electronic Music and MIDI Projects. Kent, England: PC Publishing, 1994.
Pressing, Jeff. Synthesizer Performance and Real-Time Techniques. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions, 1992.
Rathbone, Andy. MP3 for Dummies. Foster City, CA: IDG Books Worldwide, Inc., 1999.
Robertson, Michael, and Simpson, Ron. The Official MP3.com Guide to MP3. San Diego: MP3.com, Inc., 1999.
Rothstein, Joseph. MIDI: A Comprehensive Introduction. Madison, Wisconsin, 1992.
Simpson, Ron. The Official MP3.com Guide to MP3. San Diego: MP3.com, 1999.
Teague, Fred A.; Streit, Les D.; Rogers, Doug; Tipling, Roger. Media and Technology in the Classroom. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt, 1989.
Tully, Tim. MIDI for the Professional. New York: Amsco Publications, 1993.
Walker, Dan. Recording & Film Scoring with SMPTE. Newbury Park, California: Peter L. Alexander, 1991.
Waugh, Ian. Sequencer Secrets. Tonbridge, England: PC Publishing, 1995.
Williams, David Brian and Webster, Peter RichardExperiencing Music Technology:  Software, Data, and Hardware.  Belmont, California:  Wadsworth Group/Thomson Learning, 1999.
Winkler, Todd. Composing Interactive Music Techniques and Ideas Using Max. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 1998.

 

MIDI Computer Music
CONTRACT FOR GRADE FORM

Requirements for a grade of A:
  • Write a research paper of appropriate length to fully discuss your chosen subject on an approved topic relating to music technology.  The paper must be turned in by the end of the class period on the next-to-last class, or please feel free to keep it.  The paper should ideally involve some topic which is of interest to you, and which will be of potential benefit to you in your professional area.
  • Earn a mean score of at least 90 points on the three tests.
  • Satisfactorily complete the Sequencing Projects and the Notation Projects (no significant defects audibly or visually).
Requirements for a grade of B:
  • Earn a mean score of at least 80 points on the three tests.
  • Satisfactorily complete the Sequencing Projects and the Notation Projects (no significant defects audibly or visually).
Requirements for a grade of C:
  • Earn a mean score of at least 70 points on the three tests.
  • Satisfactorily complete the Sequencing Projects and the Notation Projects (no significant defects audibly or visually).
If you do not meet the requirements of the grade for which you contract, you may expect to receive a grade equivalent to the work which you have satisfactorily completed.  Please return this form to me by the end of the first week of classes.
I contract for a grade of:  ____.

_________________________________     ___________________________
(Signature)                                                      (Date)

 

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