Lowell Mason
The Father of Music Education in America
GEORGETOWN
C    O    L    L    E    G    E

Music 314
Foundations & Principles of Music Education

Dr. Peter LaRue, Instructor

Handout - Talking Points #1

Do You Believe?
Why it is imperative to have a sound philosophy of Music Education

A sound philosophy of music education will:
1. guide and direct our daily teaching enterprises.
[philosophy‑principles‑objectives]

2. clarify and explain our subject matter.
[students‑parents‑teachers‑administrators]

3. inspire and enlighten the meaningful nature of our teaching.
[reminder and re‑inforcement to ourselves as teachers]

A well‑founded philosophy will include:
1. your developing understanding of the aesthetic experience
2. your developing understanding of the role of music in the schools
3. your developing understanding of the nature of education in general
4. your developing understanding of your role as a professional

Y
our philosophy will continue to develop as you:
1. grow musically, intellectually and personally
2. have ongoing "quality" experiences with and about "quality" music
3. spend time in reflective thinking, not just mindless activity

The primary purpose of music education is to develop the aesthetic potential, which every human possesses to its highest possible level [Charles Leonhard]

Primary Purpose: not the only, but the primary?
Aesthetic Potential: what is aesthetic potential?
Every Human: do we really mean everyone?

Highest Possible Level: who decides what  level?

Intrinsic & Extrinsic Goals of our Music Programs
Intrinsic Goals - of the music or art - phrasing, thoughtful feeling
Extrinsic Goals - important, but not necessarily of the music - self-discipline, leadership

Ordinary Experiences
Educational experiences are divided into two basic categories - ordinary and aesthetic. Ordinary experiences are best characterized by a "definite means to a definite end". Ordinary experiences are obviously crucial to the classroom environment - but we should not limit our educational experiences to these - and these alone. [Example: student must learn basic math facts]

Aesthetic Experiences
Educational experiences are divided into two basic categories - ordinary and aesthetic. Aesthetic experiences are best characterized by "doing something - finding you enjoy this experience - and continuing to seek out this experience - just for the pure enjoyment of it". When we may shape as many aesthetic experiences as possible for our classroom - we are at our best. Ordinary experiences may and oft-times do - lead to an aesthetic experience. [Example: student reads a book on Mr. Lincoln because he  or she has to for class - then realizes they enjoy and are excited about the life of Mr. Lincoln and continue to find books and read about him]